Posts Tagged 'tropical fish'

Animal Update – September 6

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Emperor Angelfish in Blacktip Reef!

This reef-dweller, native to the Indo-Pacific, can be spotted swimming around our newest exhibit, Blacktip Reef!

One of the most amazing things about this species is the transition of their patterning and coloration from juvenile to adult!

juvenile emperor angelfish

Juvenile emperor angelfish (pictured above) are typically a dark blue with white rings.

It will take anywhere between 24 and 30 months for the angelfish to fully transition into it’s adult coloration (pictured below)!

adult emperor angelfish

Emperor angelfish typically stick to the reef’s ledges, flats and/or outer lagoon patch reefs, where they’ll feed on sponges and similar organisms.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – August 16

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Meet some of Blacktip Reef’s new fish residents:

Palette surgeonfish

national aquarium palette surgeonfish

Probably one of our most recognized species (Dory, is that you?), the palette surgeonfish can be found throughout the Indo-Pacific.

Did you know? All surgeonfish have venomous spines that run along the tops of their bodies. These sharp spines help to protect the fish from predators!

Oriental sweetlips

national aquarium oriental sweetlips

There are 35 species of “sweetlips” (including the oriental) found worldwide! These fish can be easily recognized by their big, fleshy lips!

Want to spot the oriental sweetlips in Blacktip Reef? Look for their vibrant yellow coloration and thick black and white stripes!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Blacktip Reef Update: Hundreds of Fish Introduced to the Exhibit!

Blog-Header---Blacktip

Hundreds of tropical fish have just been introduced to their new home, our Blacktip Reef exhibit!

Each of these fish plays an important role in making Blacktip Reef a complete and functional ecosystem. Guests will be able to see how species school together and interact with each other – some will connect through play while others will through important symbiotic behaviors like cleaning.

Over the next two weeks, the fish will be given time to settle into their new home. At the end of this month, larger animals including our blacktip reef sharks and rays will be introduced to the exhibit!

Stay tuned for more updates as Blacktip Reef continues to come to life! 

Animal Updates – March 1

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Juvenile hogfish in the Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit! 

This large and colorful fish is native to the Western Atlantic coral reef systems from as far north as Nova Scotia in Canada, to Bermuda, the Gulf of Mexico, and northern South America. The hogfish gets its name from its very long “pig-like” snout that it uses to root through the sandy bottoms of shallow ocean areas in search of mollusks, crabs, and sea urchins.

This is one of the juvenile hogfish now on exhibit in our Atlantic Coral Reef!

This is one of the juvenile hogfish now on exhibit in our Atlantic Coral Reef!

 The hogfish is a bright red-orange, and can grow up to 3 feet long. It typically forms social groups consisting of one male that will mate with and protect several females in its territory.

An adult hogfish

An adult hogfish

 Unfortunately, this unique species is listed as Vulnerable due to significant population declines caused by spearfishing practices, especially in the Caribbean.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – December 14

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

AnimalUpdated_DC

Bicolor Parrotfish

We have a new bicolor parrotfish in our American Samoa exhibit!

bicolor parrotfish

Did you know? Before going to sleep, this species of parrotfish spins a cocoon around its body to hide its scent from potential predators!

Parrotfish get their name from their beak-like teeth and vibrant coloration. Some species, like the bicolor parrotfish, can grow to be up to three feet in length!

They use their “beak” to eat the algae that grows on coral. The parrotfish bites off pieces of coral from the reef, pulverizing it in order to digest the algae growing inside and then excreting the limestone rock. Much of the sand in the areas where parrotfish are found is actually the coral they excrete.

This fun little video explains this “sand making” process: 

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!


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