Posts Tagged 'national aquarium'



Animal Update – January 3

national aquarium animal update

Two angelfish species added to Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit! 

A queen angelfish and a french angelfish have been introduced into our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit.

There are over 80 species of angelfish inhabiting the world’s oceans. These tropical fish make their homes in shallow waters surrounding coral reefs!

Did you know? Queen angelfish get their name from the crown-like ring that sits on their heads.

Starry puffer introduced into Blacktip Reef!

Our Blacktip Reef exhibit has a new resident – a starry pufferfish!

national aquarium starry puffer

Starry puffers can only be found in the Indo-Pacific region. Measuring up to 4 feet in length, they are one of the largest identified species of pufferfish in the world!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – December 27

national aquarium animal update

Northern Hogsuckers in Maryland Mountains to the Sea

A new group of 10 northern hogsuckers has been added to the Allegheny Stream gallery of our Maryland Mountains to the Sea exhibit!

national aquarium northern hogsucker

The hogsucker is a very distinctive-looking fish with a pronounced, fleshy mouth, which it uses to rummage through substrate and sift our food!

Did you know? These fish are good indicators of waterway health, as they are intolerant of polluted and dirty water.

Clown Triggerfish in Surviving Through Adaptation

A new clown triggerfish has been added to our Displaying gallery!

national aquarium clown triggerfish

This species gets its name from unique look – clown triggerfish have black bellies with large white spots and bright yellow lips!

Clown triggerfish are normally shy and solitary, but they can be very aggressive. Some may charge or attack intruders. When hiding from predators, triggerfish lock themselves into small openings with their trigger fin and bite down on the coral or rock to ensure their safety.

These fish can be found in many areas of the Indian and Pacific Oceans such as Africa, Indonesia, Samoa, Japan, and New Caledonia.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Our Favorite Fan Photos of 2013 pt. 1

Every year, over 1.3 million people visit the National Aquarium. Our visitors are able to witness and capture some amazing moments during the time they spend with us!

As 2013 comes to a close, we’d like to share some of our favorite fan photos with you:

Do you have a great photo from a recent visit? Share them with us at social@aqua.org, or on Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, Instagram and Google Plus

A Look Back at 2013, By the Numbers!

From the opening of $12.5 million dollar exhibit to the release of our 100th Animal Rescue animal, 2013 has been a great (very busy!) year at the National Aquarium.

Check out this re-cap of some of the amazing things our team accomplished in the last year:

[youtube http://youtu.be/YDzOJtbwn4g]

With your support, we can make 2014 an even better year!

A Fun, Green Way to Embrace the Holiday Season!

Blog-Header-FamiliesExpertU

Are your friends and family taking part in the holiday spirit by doing random acts of kindness this time of year? I’ve seen loads of wonderful, heart-warming ideas floating around online that encourage us to do something nice for someone without expecting anything in return.

I wonder if we might take a slightly different take on this great trend. Random acts of “green-ness” help not only our neighbors, but also the oceans and the planet.

Here are a few ideas that will hopefully inspire your family to get in on this giving time of year:

  • Carry two bags along on your next walk outside. Picking up recyclable items and litter on the sidewalk or in the park is one way to ensure that those items don’t end up in our storm drains and later in the ocean.
  • Give neighbors, mail carriers, hairdressers a reusable water bottle (or coffee mug) as a thank you for all they do.
  • Surprise fellow shoppers by buying a couple extra re-usable bags and offering them to people in line at the cash register.
  • !rite a thank you letter (with kiddo art!) to a local environmental group or advocate who is working hard to help oceans and the world’s aquatic treasures.
  • Thank a stranger in the grocery store for bringing their re-usable bag in instead of using the plastic one.

If you witness an act of green-ness or have ideas that you’d like to share, share them in the comments section! We’d love to hear from you!

Blog-Header-HeatherDoggett

Animal Update – December 20

national aquarium animal update
Strawberry Anemones in Surviving Through Adaptation

We have a whole colony of strawberry anemones now on exhibit in our Surviving Through Adaptation gallery!

national aquarium strawberry anemone

Did you know? These animals only grow to be about an inch wide! Like many other species of anemone, their tentacles are equipped with a potent poison which can stun prey/predators.

Strawberry anemones reproduce by splitting themselves into two identical copies, in a process known as fission. Along the ragged coast of the Pacific Ocean, you can see many rocks and ledges covered in these pink anemones!

Spotfin Butterflyfish in Lurking Gallery

A group of spotfin butterflyfish (originally from our DC location) has been added to our Lurking gallery.

national aquarium spotfin butterflyfish

Did you know? The black bar across this fish’s eye confuses predators.

This species is found in the Western Atlantic, from the east coast of the United States to Brazil.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Volunteer Spotlight: Jillie Drutz, Chesapeake Conservation Corps

We would like to welcome the newest volunteer of the Aquarium Conservation Team (ACT!), Jillie Drutz! Joining the National Aquarium as the 4th Chesapeake Conservation Corps (CCC) volunteer the department has hosted, Jillie will be dedicating a year to helping the Conservation department in their endeavors to conserve, restore, and educate about the Chesapeake watershed.

national aquarium volunteer jillie

The Chesapeake Conservation Corps, a program supported by the Chesapeake Bay Trust, was established in 2010 by the Maryland Legislature in order to provide environmental service-learning opportunities for young professionals interested in pursuing conservation careers. The initiative pairs around 25 Corps volunteers with environmental organizations focusing on Chesapeake Bay conservation all throughout Maryland.

Born and raised in Baltimore, Jillie graduated in May of 2013 from the George Washington University in Washington, DC where she earned a Bachelor’s of Science in Biological Anthropology. She always knew that one day she would dedicate some time to working to protect the Chesapeake Bay, which is why she applied to the Chesapeake Conservation Corps. Jillie feels extremely honored to be assigned to the National Aquarium, where she gets to combine her love of fieldwork and education, and where she can learn more about how a museum institution can be involved in the local community.

Jillie has already had the opportunity to participate in wetland restoration at the Masonville fringe wetland and riparian buffer restoration at Farring-Baybrook Park and Indian Head Naval Facility. She has also worked with students in our Wetland Nursery Program. She enjoys working with community volunteers and students from various backgrounds during these projects, and is excited for the opportunity to give back to her city and her Bay. She cannot wait for the field season to start again in the Spring!

Sign up for one of our upcoming conservation events and come meet our new volunteer!


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