Posts Tagged 'atlantic coral reef'

Animal Update – May 9

national aquarium animal update

Stoplight Parrotfish in Atlantic Coral Reef

Two stoplight parrotfish have been added to our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit!

stoplight parrotfish national aquarium

Photo via Flickr user Carl Haupt.

Stoplight parrotfish can be found throughout the tropical waters of the western Atlantic!

Did you know? Parrotfish are herbivores that depend on algae from the reef for sustenance. Their fused teeth help the fish crush coral, which passes through their digestive system and is deposited back on the reef as sand! A parrotfish can produce up to one ton of coral sand a year!

Fairy Basslets in Atlantic Coral Reef

Fairy basslets are small, vibrantly colored fish. With purple fronts and yellow tails, their bodies are split into two colors with a black spot on their dorsal fins.

national aquarium fairy basslet

These fish are known to swim upside-down under ledges and along cave ceilings. They live in colonies and defend their territory from other species (and even other fairy basslets). Male fairy basslets are responsible for guarding and caring for the eggs and the nest!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – April 25

national aquarium animal update

Puddingwife Wrasse in Atlantic Coral Reef!

A puddingwife wrasse has been added to our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit!

puddingwife wrasse

The puddingwife wrasse is native to the reefs of the western Atlantic (from North Carolina to Trinidad and Tobago).

This species prefers the shallow areas of the reef, where it can easily feed on sea urchins, crustaceans and brittle stars.

According to the IUCN Red List, the puddingwife is a fairly abundant species!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – April 4

national aquarium animal update

Neon Gobies in Atlantic Coral Reef 

Two neon gobies have been added to our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit!

national aquarium neon goby

Generally, neon gobies only grow to be about 1 inch in length.

Did you know? Gobies are cleaner fish! These animals can oftentimes be observed in grouped “cleaning stations” throughout the reef, where larger fish like damselfish or grunts can stop by for a quick parasite removal.

Gilded Triggerfish in Blacktip Reef

If you’ve tuned into Shark Cam lately, chances are you’ve spotted Blacktip Reef‘s gilded triggerfish!

national aquarium gilded triggerfish

The gilded triggerfish, also known as the blue-throated triggerfish, can be found throughout the reefs of the Indo-Pacific. This is one of approximately 40 species of triggerfish identified worldwide.

Triggerfish are normally shy and solitary, but they can be very aggressive. Some may charge or attack intruders. When hiding from predators, triggerfish lock themselves into small openings with their trigger fin and bite down on the coral or rock to ensure their safety.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – February 28

national aquarium animal update

Graysby in Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit! 

A graysby has been added to our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit!

national aquarium graysby

Did you know? Graysby fish are solitary and secretive animals. The often spend most of their day hiding in spots within the coral reefs where they make their home.

Graysbys vary in coloration from light grey to brown. These fish are covered in many small reddish spots!

national aquarium graysby

The graysby’s range includes the Western Atlantic Oceans from North Carolina to southern Florida, as well as the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – January 3

national aquarium animal update

Two angelfish species added to Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit! 

A queen angelfish and a french angelfish have been introduced into our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit.

There are over 80 species of angelfish inhabiting the world’s oceans. These tropical fish make their homes in shallow waters surrounding coral reefs!

Did you know? Queen angelfish get their name from the crown-like ring that sits on their heads.

Starry puffer introduced into Blacktip Reef!

Our Blacktip Reef exhibit has a new resident – a starry pufferfish!

national aquarium starry puffer

Starry puffers can only be found in the Indo-Pacific region. Measuring up to 4 feet in length, they are one of the largest identified species of pufferfish in the world!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – June 28

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community, so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Sandbar pup is on exhibit! 

Chloe, a female sandbar shark pup born at the Aquarium just over a month ago, has been moved into our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit.

sandbar shark pup

Chloe behind-the-scenes shortly after her birth.

This species of shark gets its name from their preferred habitat, the sandbars and grassy shallow areas along the Atlantic coast.

Did you know? The Chesapeake Bay is actually one of the most important nursery areas along the East Coast for sandbar sharks!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – March 1

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Juvenile hogfish in the Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit! 

This large and colorful fish is native to the Western Atlantic coral reef systems from as far north as Nova Scotia in Canada, to Bermuda, the Gulf of Mexico, and northern South America. The hogfish gets its name from its very long “pig-like” snout that it uses to root through the sandy bottoms of shallow ocean areas in search of mollusks, crabs, and sea urchins.

This is one of the juvenile hogfish now on exhibit in our Atlantic Coral Reef!

This is one of the juvenile hogfish now on exhibit in our Atlantic Coral Reef!

 The hogfish is a bright red-orange, and can grow up to 3 feet long. It typically forms social groups consisting of one male that will mate with and protect several females in its territory.

An adult hogfish

An adult hogfish

 Unfortunately, this unique species is listed as Vulnerable due to significant population declines caused by spearfishing practices, especially in the Caribbean.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!


Sign up for AquaMail

Like us on Facebook!

Twitter Updates