Posts Tagged 'animal updates'



Animal Update – August 3

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Bonnethead Sharks in New Home

Our two bonnethead sharks have moved from Wings in the Water to their new home in our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit.

This move is due to preparations for our new exhibit, Blacktip Reef, opening in summer 2013. The new exhibit will be a vibrant new habitat replicating a salt-water Indo-Pacific ocean habitat featuring new animals including blacktip reef sharks, reticulated whiptail rays, and ornate wobbegong sharks! Click here to find out more about Blacktip Reef.

Golden Lion Tamarins

Our golden lion tamarin monkeys have been taken off exhibit for the time being as a precautionary measure due to nesting birds in the exhibit. Don’t worry, they’ll be back!

We have so many amazing animals in the Upland Tropical Rain Forest exhibit — it’s a great time to see some of them during your visit. Click here to learn more about some of the animals!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – July 27

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!


New Vanilla Vine

Guests can now spot a Vanilla Vine (vanilla planifolia or the vanilla orchid) climbing in our Upland Tropical Rain Forest exhibit.

This vine climbs the trunks of trees throughout the world’s tropics.  Originally native to Mexico, this species has been spread around the globe, farmed for its valuable seed pod, in order to produce vanilla flavoring.  In its native habitat the flower, which will eventually produce the desired pod, is pollinated by a small stingless bee that is endemic to Mexico.  This confined the vanilla industry because without the particular species bee, the pods would not form.  It was only when the discovery that the flower could be hand pollinated that the vanilla industry was able to spread worldwide.

New Damselfish 

Two brightly colored Azure Damselfish have been added to our Survival through Adaptation exhibit.

These fish are easy to spot because of their bright blue and yellow coloration!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – May 18

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our WATERlog blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Dolphin Update

For the past several days, we have been monitoring our dolphin family following a health concern with Beau. We’re very happy to report that he’s doing much better today!

What first concerned us with Beau was a change in his appetite. To keep our dolphins healthy and happy, we feed them a specific amount of food every day. When they show a lack of interest in this food it is often the first sign of a problem or illness. Our animals’ wellbeing is our primary concern so when this happened, our staff and trainers immediately began to closely monitor Beau’s diet and vitals 24 hours a day. Although Beau was assist fed during this time, our staff continued to encourage him to eat on his own.

After a few days, Beau’s health concern started affecting others in our dolphin family. For a short time, Foster, our other male dolphin and Beau’s close buddy, started to mimic Beau’s symptoms. Aquarium staff has also become concerned with Jade and is watching her carefully.

Today, we’re happy to report significant improvements – Beau and Foster are both eating on their own. They are active, playful and their general demeanor has improved.

We want to thank everyone for their support and understanding during this time. Although we have no way of knowing the timeline of this situation, we look forward to a continued and speedy recovery.

About Beau
Name meaning:
Beau also means “Handsome”. This name was chosen to go with his mother Nani’s name, which means “Beautiful” in Hawaiian.
Sex: Male
Weight: 350 pounds
Birthday: June 27, 2005, at the National Aquarium
Family Tree: Son of Nani (dam) and Bob (sire)
How to Recognize: Guests can recognize Beau by his skinnier rostrum, consistent gray coloration of entire lower jaw and crooked teeth in lower jaw
Trainer’s Note: Beau is best buddies with Foster and is often playing with and chasing him.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!


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