Posts Tagged 'animal dads'

Celebrating Awesome Animal Dads!

In celebration of Father’s Day, we’re highlighting some of the animal kingdom’s most attentive and incredible animal dads!

Midwife Toad

What this amphibious species lacks in vibrant look and behavior it makes up for in paternal care.

midwife toad

Once fertilized, the male midwife toad wraps strands of eggs around his legs to protect them from predators.

Then, once they are ready to hatch, the male toad will wade into a wet, shallow area to allow the tadpoles to spring from their eggs.

Midwife toads can be found throughout western Europe and northern Africa.

Siamese Fighting Fish

Sure they’re best known for their looks and popularity at the pet store, but did you know Siamese fighting fish are some of the most dedicated dads around?

siamese fighting fish

Males must work hard to impress a mate, fighting amongst themselves and showing off their ornate plumage to attract a female. Their work is not done once they find a partner; male Siamese fighting fish must also build a nest made of floating bubbles, coating each individual bubble in saliva to avoid any popping.

The male continues his fathering duties by immediately swallowing the freshly-born eggs and spitting them into his nest. He ensures the survival of almost all eggs, spending the 24 to 36 hour incubation period catching any falling eggs and returning them to the nest. The father wards off any potential predators – even the mother! After the eggs hatch, the fish guard the newborns while grow strong off of their egg sack.

Jacana

Male jacanas are known for their intense display of paternal pride.

jacana

Female jacanas are rather flighty, mating with as many males as possible and mostly ignoring their eggs. The males complete all of the preparation and care for their children, including:  building nests, incubating eggs and protecting newborns!

Jacana males are such good fathers they’ll even nurture other males’ fertilized eggs!

Seahorses

The vast majority of the members of this family share an unusual reproductive strategy. The males have a specialized pouch into which the female deposits her eggs. It’s the fathers who brood the eggs. That’s right: Males brood and bear the young.

longsnout seahorse

May and June mark the peak breeding season for the Chesapeake’s two species of pipefish: the Northern and the dusky pipefish. The males brood their eggs for two weeks before giving birth to fully formed baby pipefish.

How are you celebrating Father’s Day? Tell us in the comments section!

 

Meet Some of the Best Dads in the Animal Kingdom!

In celebration of Father’s Day this weekend, meet some truly awesome animal dads!

Seahorses

longsnout seahorses

Male seahorses take on an interesting role when it comes to parenting. It is the male who becomes pregnant and delivers the babies! Seahorses have monogamous relationships, and the male cares for the unhatched eggs, regulating the conditions inside the pouch where the eggs are stored.

Arowanas

silver arowana

Arowana dads do a lot to take care of their little ones! A male arowana will build a nest for young fish, as well as protect them from harm. If his spawn are in danger, he’ll suck them up into his mouth to keep them from getting hurt.

Emperor Penguins

emperor penguin

Photo via National Geographic.

The male emperor penguin is a dedicated dad! After laying her egg, a penguin mom will return to the ocean for two months to fish. During that time, the male cradles the egg between his feet, taking care not to expose it to the elements. He does not eat until the mother returns!

Mouth Almighty

mouth almighty

When breeding, it is the male that will take up the female’s sack of eggs and incubate them in his mouth for about two weeks. After the eggs hatch, the developing fry will continue to stay in the safety of the male’s mouth for about another week. During this time, the male does not eat.

Golden Lion Tamarins

golden lion tamarin

Male golden lion tamarins are ever the attentive fathers! They will “co-parent” offspring with their mate and can often be observed carrying their young on their backs in between feedings.

Be sure to bring Dad to the Aquarium this weekend to meet some of these incredible animal parents in person! 


Sign up for AquaMail

Like us on Facebook!

Twitter Updates


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 263 other followers