Archive for the 'News' Category



Q&A with Marine Photographer and Environmentalist Bob Talbot!

In advance of his special lecture at the Aquarium on April 22nd (Earth Day), we chatted with world-renowned marine photographer/filmmaker and dedicated environmentalist Bob Talbot about what inspires his work and how he uses the power of film to advocate for our blue planet!

Bob Talbot

How did you first become interested in photography?

I began snorkeling when I was eight years old. When I was thirteen I became a certified diver. The following Christmas I was given my first camera. I enrolled in an after-school photo class and soon realized that photography was the perfect medium for me to share what I was experiencing in the sea with others.

How did you start in underwater photography/filmmaking?

Soon after I began diving I met a fellow student that who had also just begun diving. Inspired by Jacques Cousteau, we photographed whatever we could in the waters off the coast of southern California. When we were fourteen, we acquired a sixteen-foot inflatable boat that opened up a whole new world to us. We now had access to the whales and dolphins that eventually became the main focus of my work.

When we were nineteen, I got my hands on a wind up 16mm movie camera. With no idea precisely where we were going, we loaded up a Datsun pickup and “trailered” the inflatable to Vancouver Island in hopes of filming orcas in the wild.

 That trip was the first of several to the Pacific Northwest to photograph orcas. It was a fool’s undertaking, fueled only by youthful enthusiasm and the passion to get an image on film. Those early days of trial-and-error honed the skills I use today. There was no formal training to become a marine wildlife photographer—an odd combination of photographer, naturalist, boatman and filmmaker.

 The sea was our playground, our classroom. And it taught us as much about how to learn as it did anything else.

What inspires your passion for ocean conservation?

I’ve been drawn to the sea since I was a child. Long before I understood its importance to life on this planet, the ocean was a source of comfort and inspiration. Its inhabitants never cease to amaze me—it’s liquid form an ever changing piece of art to be shared with the world. So I suppose on one hand my passion for ocean conservation is purely selfish. Though much more important is how critical the sea is to the survival of all living things.

Bob Talbot Photography

There is a part of me that has come to the intellectual realization that what we have done to the sea is a natural progression of evolution. But in my heart I can’t accept this. We know of no other planet where life now exists. I simply can’t stand by and watch the destruction of such a unique and vital place.

 How do you hope to inspire conservation in others?

I hope to inspire people with immersive film experiences that provide context and perspective through compelling stories. Old school conservation has become passé. I feel that we have reached a point in time when the environmental movement needs to reinvent itself.

I believe the way to move forward is to present issues in a clear and non-judgmental fashion, while providing logical and effective action to bring about meaningful change.

 What do you love most about the natural world?

 Purity and truth.

 If you could only capture one animal for the rest of your life, what would it be? Why? 

 Orcas. They are the animals with whom I came of age both in my life and in my work.

 Their power, intelligence, grace and form continue to inspire me.

Join us for Bob Talbot’s Upcoming Lecture!

What: “The Power of Film: Inspiring Action for Monterey Bay”

When: April 22nd, 7pm EST

Where: National Aquarium and a livestream online via Google Hangout!

For more information of our Marjorie Lynn Bank lecture series, visit aqua.org/lectures!

Animal Rescue Update: 13 Turtles Ready for Release This Week!

national aquarium Animal Rescue Update

Our Animal Rescue team is excited to announce that 13 of our current sea turtle patients in rehabilitation are going to be released this week! Animal Rescue and Animal Health staff have been busy the last few weeks clearing patients for releasing, making sure all releasable turtles have their required tags, and making sure we have all the pertinent paperwork and permits for the transport and release.

This Wednesday, several staff from the National Aquarium will pack the turtles for their long road trip south. So, how exactly do you transport a sea turtle? Each turtle is fitted for an appropriate sized transport carrier, which is padded with foam and towels to provide lots of cushion and support.

Each turtle will receive some fluids just under their skin to help keep them hydrated, and they’ll also get a water-based lubricant massaged onto their shell to help retain moisture, and some sterile eye lubricant helps keep their eyes moist. Finally, each turtle will be packed into our temperature-controlled transport vehicle and will be safely secured for the transport.

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Once our vehicle is ready, our staff will make the 800 mile drive to northeast Florida to release the turtles. We’ll have a total of 9 Kemp’s ridley and 4 green sea turtles to release on this trip, and the much warmer waters of Florida are perfect this time of year.

Stay tuned for more updates on their release, as well as updates on our remaining rehab patients!

national aquarium animal rescue expert

Animal Update – April 11

national aquarium animal update

Mary River Turtle in Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes

A Mary river turtle is now on exhibit in our Animal Planet Australia exhibit!

Mary River Turtle

Australia’s largest species of freshwater turtle can only be found in the southeastern region of Queensland’s Mary River – the derivative of its common name. Due to its isolated range and a high pet trade demand for the species in the ’60s and ’70s, the Mary river turtle is currently one of the top 25 most endangered turtle species in the world.

Did you know? The tail of a Mary river turtle is lined with gill-like structures, which they use to extract oxygen from the water and remain submerged for long periods of time!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Thoughtful Thursday: Inspiring the Next Generation of Ocean-Lovers

Our celebration of National Volunteer Appreciation Week continues with a special story about one of the Aquarium’s volunteers and her students!

Abbe Harman has been a volunteer supporter of the National Aquarium for 28 years and a teacher for for Frederick County Public Schools for 25 years. As an Enrichment Specialist at Middletown Elementary School, Abbe works closely with fifth grade students, teaching them about the Chesapeake Bay watershed and coral reef ecosystems!

Yesterday, Abbe hosted a large group of her fifth graders for a special field trip tot he Aquarium! The students were able to see their teacher in-action, as she led an interactive lesson and fed the animals in our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit!

national aquarium volunteer diver

In the weeks leading up to their field trip, Abbe’s students also had the opportunity to enter an essay contest for the opportunity to go on a special behind-the-scenes tour of the Aquarium.

Abbe, from all of us here at the National Aquarium, thank you for being a longtime supporter of our mission and an impactful educator.

Do you volunteer? Share your story with us in the comments section and online using #NVW14!

A Blue View: Clownfish

A Blue View is a weekly perspective on the life aquatic, hosted by National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli.

From the smallest plants and animals invisible to the human eye to entire ecosystems, every living thing depends on and is intricately linked by water.

Tune in to 88.1 WYPR every Tuesday at 5:45 p.m. as John brings to the surface important issues and fascinating discoveries making waves in the world today.

April 9, 2014: Clownfish

A Blue View podcastClick here to listen to John discuss
clownfish and the important role
they play in the health of coral reefs!

Parents of young children know a thing or two about clownfish. These adorable orange and white fish rocketed to stardom in the animated classic Finding Nemo, which featured an adventurous clownfish hero.

Finding Nemo

Clownfish popularity, however, extends far beyond the preschool set. The movie led to an upswing in their demand within the exotic pet trade – they are now one of the most popular saltwater aquarium fish.

That was the downside of the Nemo-effect. The upside? More people became interested in coral reef conservation. It is an ecosystem of tremendous importance, fragility and interdependence, and clownfish are an indicator species for reef health.

Further, they are truly fascinating creatures. When Nemo’s dad, Marlin, names all of the eggs Marlin Junior, the moviemakers got the science right: all clown fish are born male. Many fish species are able to change sex, almost always from female to male. But the clownfish is different, changing gender only to become the dominant female of the group, and that change is irreversible. In a clownfish group living in an anemone the largest fish is female, the second largest a male. They are the mating pair.

But the adventure story of Nemo’s dad traveling far and wide to find his son? Unscientific. In the wild, clownfish never venture far from their anemone. It’s home…and pantry. It’s this interdependence that has earned the fish their full name: the anemone clownfish.

national aquarium clownfish

The relationship between anemones and anemone clownfish is a classic oceanic partnership of mutualism.

In science, mutualism is defined as a relationship between two species in which both benefit from the association. In fact, clownfish and anemones probably couldn’t live without each other, which qualifies them as “obligate symbionts.”

They couldn’t be more different, yet they need each other to survive. The clownfish is a vertebrate, while a sea anemone is an invertebrate, closely related to corals and jellyfish. And like them, its sting is deadly to most other creatures.

So how does the clownfish manage to live among the anemone’s lethal tentacles? Well, very cautiously. As the clownfish gets to know its anemone, it does an elaborate ballet of tentative darting movements, touching the anemone’s stinging tentacles gently, working up immunity and a protective layer of mucus.

Once they’ve acclimated to each other, they eat each other’s food scraps. The anemone’s tentacles provide the clownfish with protection from predators. The clownfish protects the anemone from predators like the butterfly fish and nibbles the anemone free of parasites. Cozy, right?

But scientists have recently discovered that there is additional complexity to the relationship.

The anemone benefits from the clownfish’s ammonia-rich waste. It’s like anemone fertilizer: it helps the animal grow.

After all, a bigger anemone is better for both; its larger tentacles can snare larger, more nutritious prey and the clownfish gets better leftovers and more spacious living quarters.

There’s also a fascinating nocturnal half to the anemone-clownfish routine. Scientists used to think that at night the clownfish snuggled quietly inside the anemone. But Dr. Nanette Chadwick and her team at Auburn University recently discovered that the clownfish moves around more than was suspected, reminiscent of a dog trying to get comfortable on its dog bed.

The clownfish’s movements oxygenate the water deep within the anemone’s tangle of tentacles. In effect, the clownfish helps the anemone breathe.

Clownfish and anemones literally cannot live without one another. In the sea, as in Hollywood, they call that chemistry!

Blog-Header-JohnRacanelli


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