Archive for the 'Plant Update' Category

Plant Update – July 5

PlantUpdate_baltimore

Our golden candle plant is flowering! 

The golden candle is actually one of the first plants guests see upon entering our Upland Tropical Rain Forest exhibit.

golden candle plant

Also known as the lollipop plant or the golden shrimp plant, it has yellow spiky structures (known as bracts) that protect white flowers. The leaves that surround the golden candle plant’s yellow structure are each around six inches long. The plant earned the nickname “shrimp plant” because the bracts are arranged in a pattern that resembles scales on a shrimp.

golden candle plant

The golden candle can grow to be about two to six feet tall in its natural habitat, the rain forests of Peru. While the plant blooms year-round in its native rain forests, it often blooms seasonally when grown in the United States.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal/Plant Updates – May 3

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Meet our new orbicular burrfish!

We have a new orbicular burrfish on exhibit in our Hiding gallery!

Orbicular burrfish

Native to Indo-Pacific reefs, the orbicular burrfish hides in large sponges during the day and comes out at night to feed. While they may look sweet, these fish have a mean bite! They’re mouth structures are built for crushing hard-shelled invertebrates.

Did you know? Orbicular burrfish, like all burrfish and pufferfish species, can take in water to inflate their bodies when threatened.

PlantUpdate_baltimore

Cacao tree has new pods!

The cacao tree in our Upland Tropical Rain Forest exhibit has two new pods!

cacao tree

Seeds found in the pods of this South American tree are used to make chocolate! Cacao pods can range in color (from green to a deep maroon) depending on genetics and ripeness.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Super FISH Bowl: Our Fantasy Team Line-Up

As the competition between the Baltimore Ravens and the San Francisco 49ers heats up in anticipation of Sunday’s Super Bowl XLVII, the National Aquarium, Baltimore and the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco are enlisting the help of their aquatic animals to take their own friendly rivalry off the green and into the blue in the Super FISH Bowl!

You can’t have a #SuperFISHBowl without a strong team! As part of our fun wager, each organization is building their ultimate fantasy animal line-up!

Here’s who we’ve got out on the field:

Kicker – Blue Crab
Cornerback – Golden Lion Tamarins
Defensive Line – Sand Tiger Sharks
Fullback – Dolphins
Linebacker – Porcupine Fish
Quarterback – Blue Hyacinth Macaw (Margaret)
Center – Snapping Turtle
Wide Receiver – Tarpon
Tight End – Roughtail Ray
Coach – Octopus (Poulpe)
Referees – Banggai Cardinalfish
Cheerleader – Green Sea Turtle (Calypso)

Tell us your favorite player & they could be our fan-voted MVP!

Animal Updates – July 27

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!


New Vanilla Vine

Guests can now spot a Vanilla Vine (vanilla planifolia or the vanilla orchid) climbing in our Upland Tropical Rain Forest exhibit.

This vine climbs the trunks of trees throughout the world’s tropics.  Originally native to Mexico, this species has been spread around the globe, farmed for its valuable seed pod, in order to produce vanilla flavoring.  In its native habitat the flower, which will eventually produce the desired pod, is pollinated by a small stingless bee that is endemic to Mexico.  This confined the vanilla industry because without the particular species bee, the pods would not form.  It was only when the discovery that the flower could be hand pollinated that the vanilla industry was able to spread worldwide.

New Damselfish 

Two brightly colored Azure Damselfish have been added to our Survival through Adaptation exhibit.

These fish are easy to spot because of their bright blue and yellow coloration!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!


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