Posts Tagged 'upland tropical rain forest'



Plant Update – July 5

PlantUpdate_baltimore

Our golden candle plant is flowering! 

The golden candle is actually one of the first plants guests see upon entering our Upland Tropical Rain Forest exhibit.

golden candle plant

Also known as the lollipop plant or the golden shrimp plant, it has yellow spiky structures (known as bracts) that protect white flowers. The leaves that surround the golden candle plant’s yellow structure are each around six inches long. The plant earned the nickname “shrimp plant” because the bracts are arranged in a pattern that resembles scales on a shrimp.

golden candle plant

The golden candle can grow to be about two to six feet tall in its natural habitat, the rain forests of Peru. While the plant blooms year-round in its native rain forests, it often blooms seasonally when grown in the United States.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal/Plant Updates – May 3

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Meet our new orbicular burrfish!

We have a new orbicular burrfish on exhibit in our Hiding gallery!

Orbicular burrfish

Native to Indo-Pacific reefs, the orbicular burrfish hides in large sponges during the day and comes out at night to feed. While they may look sweet, these fish have a mean bite! They’re mouth structures are built for crushing hard-shelled invertebrates.

Did you know? Orbicular burrfish, like all burrfish and pufferfish species, can take in water to inflate their bodies when threatened.

PlantUpdate_baltimore

Cacao tree has new pods!

The cacao tree in our Upland Tropical Rain Forest exhibit has two new pods!

cacao tree

Seeds found in the pods of this South American tree are used to make chocolate! Cacao pods can range in color (from green to a deep maroon) depending on genetics and ripeness.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – April 19

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Amazon Tree Boa on exhibit! 

Our juvenile Amazon tree boa has been very active on exhibit lately!

amazon tree boa

Adult Amazon tree boas can reach up to 6.5 feet in length. Found throughout South America, this species of tree boa is a nocturnal predator. Currently in its juvenile “yellow phase,” these snakes change color once they reach adulthood.

animal update

Silver-beaked Tanagers on exhibit! 

Six silver-beaked tanagers are now on exhibit in the Upland Tropical Rain Forest! These tanagers are well-known for their deep crimson hue and striking beak.

silver beaked tanager

The silver-beaked tanager ranges from Colombia to Bolivia and along the east coast including Brazil, Paraguay and as far south as Argentina. Although this species is not currently listed as threatened, the destruction of their habitat for industrial/agricultural gain could put them at risk in the near future.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – April 12

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Recapped Cardinals on exhibit! 

We have a pair of redcapped cardinals now on exhibit in the Upland Tropical Rain Forest!

redcapped cardinal national aquarium

Similar to the well-known American Cardinal, this South American bird is a type of finch! Redcapped cardinals use their strong beaks for cracking seeds and sturdy legs for perching.

redcapped cardinal national aquarium

Redcapped cardinals have surprisingly large feet, which allow them to walk steadily on floating vegetation as they feed in the mangrove swamps. Like many other finches, these songbirds have a beautiful call!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – March 22

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

Lined Seahorses

We have two new lined seahorses in our Surviving Through Adaptation exhibit – a male named Kuda (Malaysian for “seahorse”) and a female named Monroe!

Lined Seahorse

Lined Seahorse at National Aquarium, Baltimore
Photo courtesy of Michael Bentley

Did you know? This species of seahorse can actually be found in the Chesapeake Bay! Lined seahorses can vary drastically in both coloration and ornamentation.  They can range from a yellowish color all the way down the spectrum to nearly black.  Some may have intricate ornamentation on their backs and their heads.  Lined seahorses can also change color slightly to match their surroundings!

Golden Lion Tamarins

Our golden lion tamarins, found in the Upland Tropical Rain Forest exhibit, have been spending more time in one of the mahogany trees situated closer to ground level, giving visitors some great opportunities to see them up close!

golden lion tamarin

Check out this GREAT photo from one of our recent visitors, Instagram user kfollm!

Next time you’re up in the rain forest, be sure to look up and hopefully spot one of these amazing animals!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!


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