Posts Tagged 'surviving through adaptation'

Animal Update – March 14

national aquarium animal update

Purple Urchins in Surviving Through Adaptation

Five purple sea urchins have been added to our Surviving Through Adaptation exhibit.

national aquarium sea urchin

Did you know? Sea urchins are sometimes referred to as sea hedgehogs! These spiny animals are echnioderms – they’re related to sea stars, sand dollars and sea cucumbers.

Sea urchins have movable spines that are used mostly for protection. Depending on the species, the spines can be solid, hollow or filled with poison!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – January 31

national aquarium animal update

Sailfin Sculpin in Surviving Through Adaptation

Two sailfin sculpins have been added to the Feeding gallery of our Surviving Through Adaptation exhibit.

national aquarium sailfin sculpin

Also known as the “eye-banded sailor fish,” sailfin sculpins are found through the eastern Pacific ocean – from Alaska to southern California. This species prefers to stay along the shoreline where there are lots of rocky, algae-covered crevices.

Did you know? Their common name is derived from the sail-like fin that sits on top of their heads!

Plumose Anemones Added to Surviving Through Adaptation

Two plumose anemones have also been added to our Feeding gallery!

national aquarium plumose anemone

Plumose anemones are common from southern Alaska to southern California. Young specimens will often form dense colonies on pilings, floats, breakwaters and jetties in bays and harbors.

These animals are easily recognized by their tall, column-like bodies, which are topped with a “plume” of many short oral arms.

To feed, these anemones sweep passing seawater with their tentacles to filter out zooplankton!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – December 20

national aquarium animal update
Strawberry Anemones in Surviving Through Adaptation

We have a whole colony of strawberry anemones now on exhibit in our Surviving Through Adaptation gallery!

national aquarium strawberry anemone

Did you know? These animals only grow to be about an inch wide! Like many other species of anemone, their tentacles are equipped with a potent poison which can stun prey/predators.

Strawberry anemones reproduce by splitting themselves into two identical copies, in a process known as fission. Along the ragged coast of the Pacific Ocean, you can see many rocks and ledges covered in these pink anemones!

Spotfin Butterflyfish in Lurking Gallery

A group of spotfin butterflyfish (originally from our DC location) has been added to our Lurking gallery.

national aquarium spotfin butterflyfish

Did you know? The black bar across this fish’s eye confuses predators.

This species is found in the Western Atlantic, from the east coast of the United States to Brazil.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!


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