Posts Tagged 'porcupinefish'

Animal Update – March 28

national aquarium animal update

Balloonfish in Lurking

A balloonfish has been added to our Lurking exhibit!

national aquarium balloonfish

Balloonfish are mostly nocturnal animals, spending most of their nights feeding on a mixed diet of mollusks, sea urchins and crabs.

Did you know? Balloonfish have fused teeth, especially designed to crush through the shells of their prey!

Like other species of pufferfish, this species will fill with water and expand to nearly twice its size when threatened.

Wolf Eel in Kelp Forest

A small wolf eel has nicely settled into our Kelp Forest exhibit!

national aquarium wolf eel

Did you know? Wolf eels are not actually eels, instead they part of the Anarhichadidae family of “wolf fishes.” These animals are fairly solitary and territorial – they have even been observed in the wild biting at sharks to keep them out of their caves!

This fish lives in the North Pacific from the Sea of Japan, to islands off the coast of Alaska, to the coast of southern California.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – October 5

Between our Baltimore and Washington, DC, venues, more than 17,500 animals representing 900 species call the National Aquarium home. There are constant changes, additions, and more going on behind the scenes that our guests may not notice during their visit. We want to share these fun updates with our community so we’re bringing them to you in our weekly Animal Update posts!

Check our blog every Friday to find out what’s going on… here’s what’s new this week!

A new porcupinefish in our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit! 

We have a new porcupinefish Diodon hystrix in our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit! You can easily spot our newest addition, Gizmo, because she is the smallest of our three porcupinefish in the reef.

Did you know? A porcupinefish can grow to a maximum length of 3 feet!

Porcupinefish, also known as blowfish or pufferfish, are found in shallow temperate and tropical seas worldwide. They range in color from olive to brown, with a pale underside and dark spots over the entire body.

Porcupinefish inflate their body by swallowing water or air. They almost double in size to reduce the range of potential predators!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!


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