Posts Tagged 'frogs'



Celebrate the songs of spring

Mother Nature has subtle ways of reminding us that winter is quickly coming to an end. The trees are beginning to bud, and early bulbs are peeking through the earth where just a few weeks ago snow was piled high. Mother Nature is also telling us to listen. Do you hear the birds and frogs singing? Yes, frogs. They are quite good singers!

Frogs are emerging to announce the new season. Each winter frogs go into hibernation. Wood frogs actually freeze, but do not die. As the temperature drops, a wood frog will bury itself. It stops breathing, its heart stops beating, and the water in its body turns to ice. Come spring, these frogs are the first to emerge, as early as February and March, even with ice still on the ponds. Listen for the males calling. It sounds something like quacking or clucking.

The spring peepers are the next group to begin their chorus, and they are extremely vocal. This small frog, the size of a thumb nail, can produce sounds louder than a vacuum cleaner. An entire chorus of peepers (120dB) can top the decibel level of a rock concert (115 dB)! Though nocturnal, the peeper gets its name from its call. It peeps once a second!

Continue reading ‘Celebrate the songs of spring’

Last chance to see frogs!

Did you know that the poisonous dart frogs at the National Aquarium aren’t really poisonous? Or that there’s a 2.2 pound African bull frog living at the Aquarium? 

These fascinating creatures are only a hop away! Don’t miss your last chance to experience the beauty and diversity of some of our favorite amphibian friends in Frogs! A Chorus of Colors. After 3 years at the National Aquarium, this traveling exhibit will close on Sunday, November 2nd as the Frogs hop onto their next location.

With nearly 20 species of frogs and toads in 15 seperate habitats, the exhibit offers a close-up look at these diverse creatures from across the world! Frogs are an important indicator of our evironment’s health. So when you visit, take a moment to learn how the amphibian population is being threatened and simple things you can do to help save these spectacular and important animals.

My, what strange ears you have!

An American bullfrog sounds like rumm...rumm....rumm....Frogs and hearing: It’s true that frogs do not have outside ears that direct sound inward to the eardrum as humans do. But most frogs do have an eardrum of sorts, an inner ear, and a middle ear. They hear with these structures and one more – their lungs! A frog has an unbroken air link from the lungs to the eardrums. Scientists think this link serves two purposes: to help the frog locate sound and possibly to protect its ears from its own raucous calls.

You can learn more about these remarkable life forms by visiting the Frogs! A Chorus of Color exhibit at the National Aquarium. Frogs are among the most visually stunning, vocally pleasing, and adaptive life forms on earth, but their chorus is fading due habitat destruction, climate change, and pollution. The beauty and elegance of frogs is often overlooked, but we invite you to take a closer look! And a good listen!

 


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