Posts Tagged 'Exhibits'

Animal Update – April 18

national aquarium animal update

Spotted Lagoon Jellies in Jellies Invasion!

We have spotted lagoon jellies now on exhibit in Jellies Invasion: Oceans Out of Balance!

Did you know? Instead of a single mouth, this species of jelly has many small mouth openings on its oral arms, which capture plankton.

These jellies love the sunlight! It fuels the growth of symbiotic algae in their tissues, giving them a greenish-brown to blue color in the wild.

Spotted lagoon jellies can be found throughout the South Pacific!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – April 11

national aquarium animal update

Mary River Turtle in Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes

A Mary river turtle is now on exhibit in our Animal Planet Australia exhibit!

Mary River Turtle

Australia’s largest species of freshwater turtle can only be found in the southeastern region of Queensland’s Mary River – the derivative of its common name. Due to its isolated range and a high pet trade demand for the species in the ’60s and ’70s, the Mary river turtle is currently one of the top 25 most endangered turtle species in the world.

Did you know? The tail of a Mary river turtle is lined with gill-like structures, which they use to extract oxygen from the water and remain submerged for long periods of time!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – April 4

national aquarium animal update

Neon Gobies in Atlantic Coral Reef 

Two neon gobies have been added to our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit!

national aquarium neon goby

Generally, neon gobies only grow to be about 1 inch in length.

Did you know? Gobies are cleaner fish! These animals can oftentimes be observed in grouped “cleaning stations” throughout the reef, where larger fish like damselfish or grunts can stop by for a quick parasite removal.

Gilded Triggerfish in Blacktip Reef

If you’ve tuned into Shark Cam lately, chances are you’ve spotted Blacktip Reef‘s gilded triggerfish!

national aquarium gilded triggerfish

The gilded triggerfish, also known as the blue-throated triggerfish, can be found throughout the reefs of the Indo-Pacific. This is one of approximately 40 species of triggerfish identified worldwide.

Triggerfish are normally shy and solitary, but they can be very aggressive. Some may charge or attack intruders. When hiding from predators, triggerfish lock themselves into small openings with their trigger fin and bite down on the coral or rock to ensure their safety.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – March 28

national aquarium animal update

Balloonfish in Lurking

A balloonfish has been added to our Lurking exhibit!

national aquarium balloonfish

Balloonfish are mostly nocturnal animals, spending most of their nights feeding on a mixed diet of mollusks, sea urchins and crabs.

Did you know? Balloonfish have fused teeth, especially designed to crush through the shells of their prey!

Like other species of pufferfish, this species will fill with water and expand to nearly twice its size when threatened.

Wolf Eel in Kelp Forest

A small wolf eel has nicely settled into our Kelp Forest exhibit!

national aquarium wolf eel

Did you know? Wolf eels are not actually eels, instead they part of the Anarhichadidae family of “wolf fishes.” These animals are fairly solitary and territorial – they have even been observed in the wild biting at sharks to keep them out of their caves!

This fish lives in the North Pacific from the Sea of Japan, to islands off the coast of Alaska, to the coast of southern California.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – March 14

national aquarium animal update

Purple Urchins in Surviving Through Adaptation

Five purple sea urchins have been added to our Surviving Through Adaptation exhibit.

national aquarium sea urchin

Did you know? Sea urchins are sometimes referred to as sea hedgehogs! These spiny animals are echnioderms – they’re related to sea stars, sand dollars and sea cucumbers.

Sea urchins have movable spines that are used mostly for protection. Depending on the species, the spines can be solid, hollow or filled with poison!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!


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