Posts Tagged 'conservation events'



Making a statement to Save the Bay

On the 25th anniversary of the Chesapeake Bay restoration effort, The Baltimore Sun reported that a group of over a dozen of scientists and activists have released a statement to the Environmental Protection Agency’s Chesapeake Bay Program calling for a more aggressive commitment to cleaning up the bay. Sun reporter, Tim Wheeler, has also blogged about this subject showing a dramatic image illustrating the poor health of the Bay.egret-09883-for-blog

This plea for better tactics and enforceable measures is not the first, and certainly won’t be the last one presented to officials charged with bay restoration. Officials at the National Aquarium are standing in line with all of the Chesapeake Bay advocates encouraging mandatory, enforceable measures put in place in the areas of agriculture, zoning, development, wetland restoration, the list goes on.

The Aquarium’s conservation team and volunteers spend endless hours each year restoring wetlands in and around Maryland and educating visitors on watershed health. And there are countless organizations leading their own charges, doing their part to “Save the Bay”.

The message has been made clear. Voluntary efforts to restore the bay have not succeeded. The bay’s importance to the 15 million people whose waters drain to it, from Washington, D.C., Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and as far north as upstate New York, cannot be overstated. We now know that better results over the next 25 years will only be seen through the creation of consistent, mandatory practices.

Gardening to protect our waterways: you can help!

Did you know that planting a tree or two can help save our local waterways? The National Aquarium partners with the Naval Support Facility Indian Head and the Charles Country Master Gardeners on restoration events that are rebuilding coastal habitats of the Potomac River. The next events are being held October 21-25,  and we need your help!

The goal if this project is to create a riparian buffer along the riverside. A riparian buffer is a natural biofilter that protects our waterways and prevents excess runoff from the surface pollution. In other words, planting a trees, grasses, and shrubs can be a big help in keeping our waters cleaner, and giving more animals a place to live. Ripairan buffers have played a significant role in soil conservation, improved water quality, healthy aquatic systems, and offer habitats for diverse wildlife .

Volunteers over 18 years of age and that are US citizens (due to base restrictions), are asked to join us for one or more field days from 9am-4pm on October 21-25, 2008. We can all actively do little things to help preserve our environment, no green thumb required! Click here to learn more about the event. To volunteer contact Charmaine Dahlenburg at conserve@aqua.org or 410-659-4274 by October 15.


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