Posts Tagged 'Clown triggerfish'

Animal Updates – December 27

national aquarium animal update

Northern Hogsuckers in Maryland Mountains to the Sea

A new group of 10 northern hogsuckers has been added to the Allegheny Stream gallery of our Maryland Mountains to the Sea exhibit!

national aquarium northern hogsucker

The hogsucker is a very distinctive-looking fish with a pronounced, fleshy mouth, which it uses to rummage through substrate and sift our food!

Did you know? These fish are good indicators of waterway health, as they are intolerant of polluted and dirty water.

Clown Triggerfish in Surviving Through Adaptation

A new clown triggerfish has been added to our Displaying gallery!

national aquarium clown triggerfish

This species gets its name from unique look – clown triggerfish have black bellies with large white spots and bright yellow lips!

Clown triggerfish are normally shy and solitary, but they can be very aggressive. Some may charge or attack intruders. When hiding from predators, triggerfish lock themselves into small openings with their trigger fin and bite down on the coral or rock to ensure their safety.

These fish can be found in many areas of the Indian and Pacific Oceans such as Africa, Indonesia, Samoa, Japan, and New Caledonia.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

New Exhibit Announcement: Blacktip Reef is coming in 2013!

Beginning in summer 2013, you will be able to enjoy Blacktip Reef, a breathtaking exhibit full of color, light, and movement located in the heart of National Aquarium. This coral-filled exhibit, replicating Indo-Pacific reefs, is active with life that guests can experience from many vantage points of National Aquarium, including a new floor-to-ceiling pop-out viewing window that allows guests to virtually step inside the exhibit and come face-to-face with the animals.

Artist’s rendering of the new Blacktip Reef exhibit.

As National Aquarium guests enjoy the exhibit, they can feel their heart race as a pack of blacktip reef sharks speed toward them. They may take a deep breath as they witness the rise and fall of a 5-foot-wide whipray’s massive fins beneath their feet. Explore deeper and they may spot an ornate wobbegong shark camouflaged against the reef bottom. New species will join some of National Aquarium’s beloved animals including Calypso, the 400-pound green sea turtle, and zebra sharks Zeke and Zoe, in their new home.

Reticulated whiptail ray

The namesake animal of the new exhibit, the blacktip reef shark, is a smaller shark species that can grow to about 6 feet in length and bears distinctive black tips on its fins. Blacktip reef sharks are found in the shallow waters of the Indo-Pacific, hanging around reefs to feed. These sharks are sleek, beautiful, fast-moving, and hunt cooperatively in groups.

Blacktip reef shark

Be sure to check our website for additional information and updates on the exhibit’s progress!


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