Posts Tagged 'Animal update'



Animal Updates – December 13

national aquarium animal update

Bird Wrasse in Displaying Gallery!

A bird wrasse was just added to our Displaying gallery!

national aquarium bird wrasse

The bird wrasse (Gomphosus varius) is reef fish native to the Indo-Pacific. This species, also known as the birdfish or green birdmouth wrasse, is easily recognized by its elongated, snout-like mouth, which it only grows as it reaches adulthood.

Bird wrasse fish prefer to make their homes in the lagoon and/or seaward areas within coral reef habitats.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – December 6

national aquarium animal update

Banded Moray Eel in Surviving Through Adaptation

A banded moray eel can now be seen in our Surviving Through Adaptation gallery!

national aquarium moray eel

Did you know? There are over 200 species of moray eel! Known for their serpentine appearance, morays use their long, dorsal fin to navigate through water.

These eels are fairly secretive animals. They prefer to spend most of their day hidden in crevices within their coral reef homes.

Raccoon Butterflyfish in Pacific Coral Reef 

A raccoon butterflyfish has been added to our Pacific Coral Reef exhibit!

national aquarium raccoon butterflyfish

The raccoon butterflyfish gets its name from the black “raccoon-like” mask that covers its eyes!

This reef species can be found in both the Indo-Pacific and Southeast Atlantic. Their diet usually consists of a combination of benthic invertebrates (like tube worms) and algae

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – November 15

national aquarium animal update

New Wolf Eel in Kelp Forest

A second wolf eel, former resident of our DC venue, has been introduced into our Kelp Forest exhibit!

national aquarium wolf eel

Did you know? The wolf eel is not a true eel, but part of the Anarhichadidae family of “wolf fishes.” This fish likes to live in rocky areas and is able to squeeze into small crevices due to its long, slender body.

national aquarium wolf eel

Wolf eels are attentive parents. Both males and females will wrap their bodies around the egg mass to keep it in place and protect it from predators. Only one wolf eel will leave the eggs to hunt at a time. A pair of wolf eels may remain together and mate for life.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Updates – November 8

national aquarium animal update

White-blotched river ray in Amazon River Forest

A white-blotched river ray has been introduced into our Amazon River Forest exhibit!

national aquarium white-blotched river ray

Did you know? On average, these rays are only about two feet in length! Their diet mostly consists of freshwater snails and crustaceans.

national aquarium white-blotched river ray

We love this close-up of our white-blotched ray from Flickr user adamcoop68.

This South American species makes its home in Brazil’s Xingu river basin.

Because of their limited natural range, these rays have been especially vulnerable to habitat degradation in recent years.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!

Animal Update – November 1

national aquarium animal update

Yellow Tangs in our Pacific Coral Reef exhibit!

Several yellow tangs were recently introduced into our Pacific Coral Reef  exhibit!

national aquarium instagram yellow tang

Did you know? These fish are like little lawnmowers – they spend large portions of their day picking at rocks, quickly devouring any threads of algae.

Yellow tangs are a species of surgeonfish. Like the rest of their “family,” these tangs live in tropical habitats (ranging from the Hawaiian Islands to the coast of Florida).

national aquarium yellow tang

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!


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