Posts Tagged 'animal babies'



From the Curator: A baby in the Rain Forest!

From Ken Howell: Curator of Rain Forest exhibits

We are very excited to announce a new addition to our Upland Tropical  Rain Forest exhibit!

Earlier in September, during the daily check-up of our two-toed sloths, we found that Rose had given birth to an infant.  The infant, approximately 8 inches long at birth, was born fully haired and already has its trademark claws.  The baby sloth is actively clinging and crawling about on its mom, and looks strong and healthy. 

This birth of a baby sloth, the first for the Aquarium, was certainly a ‘hoped for’ event but wasn’t planned.  Despite the fact that the two-toed sloth is fairly common, many of its most basic life history facts are still a mystery.  The discrepancy is due to the fact that actual mating is rarely observed.

Continue reading ‘From the Curator: A baby in the Rain Forest!’

New shark pups!

Baby swell sharks have begun to hatch at the National Aquarium in DC. This year the aquarists were watching over six fertilized eggs, and three have hatched this summer. The fourth and fifth are expected shortly, and the sixth still has a few months of gestation.

The picture to the right shows the latest three in their isolation basket. The swell shark is so-named because it pumps water into its stomach, causing its body to swell up. It is nocturnal, and grows to approximately three feet.

Be sure to visit www.nationalaquarium.com to learn more about all of the fascinating creatures living at the National Aquarium in DC!

We’re expecting!

Chesapeake, one of the Aquarium\'s pregnant dolphins, has an ultrasound every month or so.The National Aquarium in Baltimore is proud to announce the pregnancy of two bottlenose dolphins! Chesapeake and Shiloh are both expected to give birth in August.

Director of Animal Health Leigh Clayton works closely with the Marine Mammal team to manage the well being of the dolphins at the Aquarium. Leigh and her staff utilize ultrasounds to confirm pregnancy in dolphins. Blood hormone values (specifically progesterone) are also measured routinely and are often the first indication that an animal may be pregnant.

An Aquarium staff member performs an ultrasound on a pregnant dolphin.However, progesterone levels also increase during ovulation and may remain elevated for weeks after a normal ovulation. In addition, pseudopregnancy is possible in dolphins and hormone levels may remain elevated as if the animal is pregnant, but no fetus is present. Ultrasound is the only way to reliably confirm pregnancy. The gestational sac can be visualized as early as 4 weeks after conception and fetal heartbeat and skeletal structures can be seen as early as 6 weeks, though in our setting these are more typically seen at 8 weeks. When a pregnancy is suspected, the veterinarians and trainers work together to obtain ultrasound exams on the animals every 1-2 weeks.

Please continue visiting WaterLog for the latest updates from the Marine Mammal team as the Aquarium prepares for the births of two calves!

Special delivery: stingray pups born!

A diver collects a baby stingray in the Aquarium\'s exhibit.Southern stingray pups are born in the Wings in the Water exhibit on a regular basis. Our divers quickly catch the newborns and move them to a behind-the- scenes area so they don’t end up as food for the larger rays. These juveniles are shipped to other accredited institutions around the country. 

Southern stingrays have a gestation period of about six months. The eggs hatch within the mother’s body, and the pups, up to ten in a litter, average 9.5 inches across at birth and their “wings” are curled up – like crepes.


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