Archive for the 'National Aquarium' Category



Bill of the Week: Capital Budget

government affairs and policy update national aquarium

Governor O’Malley submitted his Fiscal Year 2015 Capital Budget to the Maryland General Assembly in early January. The $4 billion Capital Budget includes nearly $700 million for public school and university construction, $450 million for projects such as land preservation and Chesapeake Bay restoration, and $2.5 billion for transportation projects.

The Governor’s Capital Budget also includes funding for the National Aquarium for the second year in a row. If approved by the General Assembly, the State’s $1.5 million will help the Aquarium address critical infrastructure needs while simultaneously redesigning the way we communicate the remarkable aquatic treasure just beyond the Aquarium’s walls: the Chesapeake Bay.

chesapeake bay watershed

Addressing these infrastructure pieces will allow us to completely re-imagine the way we communicate the unique beauty and diversity of the Bay. Interactive exhibits – both in the main Aquarium building and outside the Aquarium walls that reach the edges of Inner Harbor – will share the success stories of and challenges still facing one of our nation’s greatest natural treasures.

The exhibit will surely give the Aquarium’s 1.4 million annual visitors – the majority of whom reside within the Chesapeake Bay’s watershed – a sense of how water connects us all.

The General Assembly will be voting on the Capital Budget over the next few weeks. The 2014 legislative session adjourns on April 7th.

Want to stay informed? Sign up for our legislative update emails and follow me on Twitter for real-time updates from Annapolis throughout session!

sarah elfreth government affairs manager national aquarium

Thoughtful Thursday: Maryland’s Lt. Governor Visits Masonville Cove

national aquarium conservation expert update

We are all custodians of the environment. - Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown

The National Aquarium’s Conservation team was excited to welcome long-time friend and environmental champion, Lt. Governor Anthony Brown to our field station at Masonville Cove earlier today!

lt governor Anthony Brown at Masonville Cove

Lt. Governor Brown was on-site to participate in one of the first training sessions that are part of the Small Watershed Action Plan. He was joined by students from Benjamin Franklin High School, National Aquarium experts and community volunteers.

In the fall of 2013, the National Aquarium took the lead on creating a Small Watershed Action Plan (SWAP) for Masonville Cove. A SWAP identifies strategies to bring a small watershed into compliance with water quality standards and goals, in collaboration with local businesses and community volunteers.

The SWAP at Masonville Cove will include a comprehensive watershed assessment that will provide valuable baseline data and guide future protection and restoration projects that will lead to improved water quality. Community members are an integral part of the process and help create a shared vision for the watershed and included neighborhoods.

Background on Masonville Cove
The National Aquarium has been involved in the Masonville Cove Project since 2003, providing opportunities for community-based restoration both within the cove and upstream in the watershed. In partnership with the Maryland Port Administration, Maryland Environmental Service, The Living Classrooms Foundation, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and community partners, National Aquarium’s goal is to provide a thriving natural area in the heart of Baltimore City.

In 2013, our site at Masonville Cove was named the nation’s first Urban Wildlife Refuge System.

If you are interested in joining us in one of our restoration projects at the cove or nearby Farring BayBrook Park this season, you can register here!

national aquarium conservation expert laura bankey

Australia Staff Caring for Eight Snapping Turtle Hatchlings!

We’re excited to share that our staff in Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes is now caring for eight snapping turtle hatchlings!

snapping turtle hatchlings

After announcing our first hatchling in late February, Aquarium staff have been very excited to see so many additional hatchlings emerge! The National Aquarium is the only Aquarium in the United States to house this turtle species. This occasion marks the first time any facility has successfully bred northern Australian snapping turtles!

All of our hatchlings are doing great – staff have observed them exhibiting lots of healthy behavior like swimming and basking in the open. The team will continue to monitor and care for these babies behind-the-scenes until they’re are grown enough to transition into the exhibit habitats.

Stay tuned for more updates as these hatchlings continue to grow! 

Go Behind-the-Scenes with Aquarium Vets!

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Ever wondered how we care for the 17,000+ animals that call the Aquarium home?

I’m excited to share the news that we’ve just launched our first-ever Veterinarian Tour, which takes guests behind-the-scenes to learn all about the fascinating world of veterinary medicine!

At the National Aquarium, we currently have a staff of four veterinarians and three vet technicians that are in charge of the medical care for all of our animals.  These animals range in size and species from our rain forest tarantula up to our dolphins, and everything in between.

All of the veterinarians at the Aquarium have gone through specialized training to work with our invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. We are proud to say that two of our veterinarians are board-certified in at least one specialty, and our other two veterinarians are currently working towards their specialty certifications.

What it takes to become a veterinarian:
To become a veterinarian, you first need to get a bachelor’s degree from an undergraduate college.  After that, you need to apply and be accepted to a college of veterinary medicine.  Currently, there are only 29 schools in the United States with a veterinary college. This means that for approximately every 10 to 12 applicants to a veterinary school, only one person will be accepted.

After graduating from four years of veterinary school, you are able to go out and practice on any animal you would like to.  However, in order to become a certified specialist with any group of animals, more training is needed.  There are numerous internships and residencies available to provide this specialized training after graduating from veterinary school.

national aquarium vet tour

The next time you visit the Aquarium, take a moment to think about what it takes to keep our animals happy and healthy.

To learn more and to get a behind-the-scenes look at our line of work, check out an upcoming Veterinary Tour.

national aquarium Leigh Clayton

Animal Update – March 7

national aquarium animal update

Blue Hamlet in Atlantic Coral Reef

A blue hamlet has been added to our Atlantic Coral Reef exhibit!

national aquarium blue hamlet

This fish, named for its iridescent blue hue, is native to Atlantic coral reef habitats (from the Florida Keys to Mexico).

Blue hamlets are typically very shy. They spend most of their days hiding in reef crevices.

Map Puffer in Blacktip Reef

Did you know? The map puffer is one of six species of pufferfish on exhibit in Blacktip Reef!

national aquarium map puffer

Map pufferfish can be found in reef habitats throughout the Indo-Pacific. Their oval shape and distinctive pattern make these fish easy to spot!

Map puffers are solitary animals. They mostly feed on invertebrates, sponges and algaes.

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!



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