Archive for the 'National Aquarium' Category



Thoughtful Thursday: Go Light’s Out for Earth Hour

national aquarium conservation expert update

2014 marks the eighth year of World Wildlife Fund (WWF)’s Earth Hour, the world’s biggest and most engaging grassroots movement that brings together communities from across the world to demand action on climate change through a global “LIGHTS OUT” event.  People from around the world will celebrate Earth Hour this Saturday, March 29th beginning at 8:30 pm local time.

Major landmarks and entire cities will go dark during this symbolic action that showcases how we, as global citizens, must take personal accountability for our daily impact on the health of the planet. By turning off the lights, switching off our electronics and turning away from our screens, we are highlighting the individual and collective actions we can make to produce real change – a change that can make a difference if we continue to commit to its ideals.

What can you do at home or at work to participate in Earth Hour?

  • Join for Earth Hour! Pledge to switch off your lights at home and show your support by registering your commitment.  Share this time with family playing games by candlelight or discovering fun ways to reduce household energy on a regular basis.
  • Go beyond the hour by supporting crowd funding or crowdsourcing environmental and social projects through Earth Hour Blue.
  • Amplify the hour. Encourage friends and family to get involved by sharing the Earth Hour video so they get a better sense of the magnitude and inspiring nature of this event.
  • Plan an Earth Hour Party! Block parties, candlelight vigils and candlelight dinners are just a few things you can do to celebrate as a community. Share the moment and consider, together, how you can reduce your footprint beyond the hour.

How is the National Aquarium participating?
From 8:30 pm-9:30 pm on Saturday, March 29th, the National Aquarium will go dark alongside hundreds of iconic landmarks and natural wonders ranging from the Eiffel Tower, the Great Pyramids, Niagara and Victoria Falls, and China’s Forbidden City.  We join over 7,000 cities and towns in 154 countries and territories with hundreds of millions of participants across seven continents in using our power to make change a reality.

This one hour of darkness may result in a small reduction of energy consumption, but more importantly paints a powerful picture of behavioral change needed to combat climate change.

Join us as we stand among hundreds of millions of people to call for action on climate change!

Laura Bankey national aquarium conservation expert

 

A Blue View: Why Turtle Rescue is Important

A Blue View is a weekly perspective on the life aquatic, hosted by National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli.

From the smallest plants and animals invisible to the human eye to entire ecosystems, every living thing depends on and is intricately linked by water.

Tune in to 88.1 WYPR every Tuesday at 5:45 p.m. as John brings to the surface important issues and fascinating discoveries making waves in the world today.

March 26, 2014: Why Turtle Rescue is Important

A Blue View podcastClick here to listen to John and Jenn Dittmar
discuss her team’s important work to
support the conservation of sea turtles!

Did you know that every species of sea turtle in US waters is endangered?

Preserving these amazing and essential sea creatures is of the utmost importance. Every year, our Manager of Animal Rescue, Jenn Dittmar, and her team respond, rehabilitate and release numerous sea turtles found stranded along the East Coast.

national aquarium animal rescue turtle

This year has been another busy season for our Animal Rescue team, with 19 turtles currently being rehabilitated in our facility! Over the last three months, many of our patients have been treated for critical conditions, including: fungal and bacterial pneumonias, infections in their flipper joints and severe shell lesions.

Eleven turtles are now ready for release back into the wild. Aquarium staff is now working with our partners at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the state of Florida to schedule a release date.

Get the full story of Chipper, Goose, and Jester, and learn more about their upcoming journey back home.

Want to learn more about what’s threatening sea turtles and what you can do to help? Listen to this week’s interview

national aquarium CEO john racanelli

An Urban Oasis for Wildlife in Winter

In the winter, most people see very little wildlife in our area, especially in Baltimore City.  However, wildlife isn’t so hard to find even in the coldest of temperatures, if you know where to look.

Wendy Alexander, who leads bird walks in the wetland adjacent to Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine, knows just where to look to find that wonderful winter wildlife.  She writes here about her time spent this winter at the Fort McHenry Wetland:

The City of Baltimore is home to one of the most active ports in the United States, but it is also home to a thriving urban wetlands area adjacent to Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine. Along with barges, tugs, and massive cruise ships, a large variety of water fowl and other birds thrive because of the successful cooperation and hard work of staff and volunteers of the National Aquarium, the National Park Conservation Association, National Park Service, Maryland Port Administration, and Steinweg Baltimore.

wildlife at fort mchenry

Photo is property of Wendy Alexander.

The Fort McHenry grounds and Wetlands ranks #2 among all time birding hotspots* in the Baltimore area (Hart Miller Island is #1) with 260 species identified by observers.  Despite the recent cold weather and snow, this winter has brought some interesting varieties of birds to the location including a very rare snowy owl, rare white-winged scoters and red-necked grebes, along with other ducks.  As of 3/8/2014, 64 species have been seen including a healthy population of bald eagles. This is a great indicator of a good supply of food such as mollusks, crustaceans, and a variety of fish.

**All photos are property of Wendy Alexander.

The number of possible bird species will certainly increase with Spring migration and the best way to enjoy this urban oasis is to join one of the scheduled bird walks that cover both the grounds and  the normally restricted Wetlands area adjacent to the grounds. These walks are led by members of the Baltimore Bird Club, which is a chapter of the Maryland Ornithological Association.  Also consider lending a hand with the National Aquairum’s Fort McHenry Field Day in April.  In a time when wetland areas along the Atlantic coast are in rapid decline, maintenance and protection of this urban wetlands area is critical to its long-run sustainability!

Sustainable Seafood Q&A with PABU’s Jonah Kim

Our Fresh Thoughts sustainable seafood dinner with PABU‘s Jonah Kim is next Tuesday, March 25th!Jonah Kim

In advance of his upcoming dinner, we chatted with Chef Kim about how the sustainable seafood movement is influencing Baltimore’s dining scene:

What’s your favorite sustainable seafood ingredient to prepare?
Oysters—I love oysters. Every oyster is different; you can source them from various regions and they come in different tastes and textures. I showcase my love for oysters in PABU’s signature dish, the Happy Spoon. This dish features a raw oyster in ponzu-flavored crème fraîche, topped with fresh uni and two types of fish roe. The combination of sweet and salty makes this one of our guests’ favorite dishes.

How is sustainable seafood playing a role in Baltimore’s dining scene?
We’re definitely lucky to be based in the mid-Atlantic region where you can find rockfish, oysters, crabs and more right in our backyard. I think the sustainable seafood movement is gaining momentum in the area, but continuing to grow the public’s awareness of and demand for sustainable seafood is key to growing it in the local dining scene.

What’s your biggest challenge when it comes to cooking sustainably?
Cooking sustainably is challenging in Japanese cuisine. Very few Japanese chefs are aware of whether or not ingredients are sustainable. Our goal at PABU is to offer the freshest product to our guests, but sometimes it’s difficult to find sustainable ingredients that are readily available. Hopefully soon, this will change.

What is one sustainable seafood ingredient you hope to see more of in restaurants (including your own) this year?
Clams. Right now we don’t have any menu items featuring clams due to the lack of availability. I’m hoping to get ahold of some in the summer. I’d love to do a fish pairing featuring spicy pork and clams.

Tell us a little bit about PABU and how your team is always churning out such delicious meals!
As the only izakaya in the Baltimore region, PABU’s concept was built from offering small plate menu options highlighting authentic Japanese flavors and local ingredients. At PABU, we pride ourselves on serving our guests the freshest ingredients from all over the world. I believe it’s the balance between texture and sweetness and spice that makes our dishes so unique and memorable.

Where do you get the seafood you serve at PABU?
PABU sources its seafood from all over the world: from the mid-Atlantic all the way to Japan. Our menu items vary according to seasonal availability of ingredients. For example, our soft-shell crabs come from the mid-Atlantic region, but we can only get our hands on those in the summer months.

If everyone could walk away from our Fresh Thoughts dinner knowing one thing, it would be…
By making the choice to dine at restaurants that support sustainable seafood, one person can make a change in the health of our oceans.

Can’t wait for the night of the 25th to see Chef Kim in action? He recently stopped by WBAL-TV to share his special Fresh Thoughts recipe for Asian Clam Chowder! Watch his segment here:

Chef Jonah Kim on WBAL

Animal Update – March 14

national aquarium animal update

Purple Urchins in Surviving Through Adaptation

Five purple sea urchins have been added to our Surviving Through Adaptation exhibit.

national aquarium sea urchin

Did you know? Sea urchins are sometimes referred to as sea hedgehogs! These spiny animals are echnioderms – they’re related to sea stars, sand dollars and sea cucumbers.

Sea urchins have movable spines that are used mostly for protection. Depending on the species, the spines can be solid, hollow or filled with poison!

Be sure to check back every Friday to find out what’s happening!


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